Tag Archives: skidaway campus notes

Wooninck appointed as acting superintendent at Gray’s Reef

Lisa Wooninck began as acting superintendent of Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary in September 2018. Lisa has a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from the University of California Santa Barbara. Her interest in policy and marine resource management stems from her time as a 2000 Knauss Sea Grant Fellow in former Congressman Sam Farr’s office. She began her NOAA career as a research fishery biologist at NOAA Fisheries headquarters and Santa Cruz lab. Her passion for using science to inform policy however was awakened and she jumped at the opportunity to join the sanctuary team in 2008. She initially worked at Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary as a policy analyst, and then joined the West Coast Regional team in 2010 as the policy coordinator for the five sanctuaries on the west coast.

Lisa has experience in policy and planning. She has also worked to coordinate conservation and user groups, and state and federal partners to develop integrated ecosystem-based management systems, and ecologically and economically sustainable practices. She has represented sanctuary interests to fishery managers and educated them on the common goals shared by sanctuaries and fisheries management. She has also led an Office of National Marine Sanctuaries team to highlight the world-class recreational activities, such as whale watching and sport fishing, offered by thriving ecosystems of national marine sanctuaries.

Lisa is guided by “malama,” a Hawaiian concept that expresses care, respect and stewardship for the environment and humans, and our obligation to care for both. Lisa also believes strongly in team work and looks forward to working with the GRNMS team, their partners and friends.

Black gill stakeholders meeting set for June 22

As the 2016 Georgia shrimping season gets underway, the University of Georgia Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant, and the UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography will host a meeting to present the latest research and other information on black gill in Georgia and South Carolina shrimp. The meeting will be held at the UGA Marine Extension Aquarium at the north end of Skidaway Island in Savannah, Ga. on Wednesday, June 22, from 1-4 p.m.

Black gill is a condition affecting the coastal shrimp population. It is caused by a microscopic parasite. Many shrimpers believe black gill may be largely responsible for reduced shrimp harvests in recent years. UGA Skidaway Institute scientist Marc Frischer is leading a research project, now in its third year, into the causes and effects of black gill on the Georgia and South Carolina shrimp population.

A shrimp with the Black Gill condition clearly evident.

A shrimp with the Black Gill condition clearly evident.

The purpose of the meeting is to provide stakeholders, such as shrimpers, fish house owners, wholesalers or anyone else interested in black gill, with an update on black gill research efforts.  Frischer and South Carolina Department of Natural Resources scientist Amy Fowler and will present their latest research findings. UGA Marine Extension and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources will also provide updates. The meeting will be open to the public.

The meeting is for information purposes only. No management decisions will be made.

For additional information, contact Bryan Fluech, UGA Marine Extension, at (912) 264-7269.

What: Black Gill Stakeholders Meeting

When: Wednesday, June 22, 1-4: p.m.

Where: UGA  Aquarium, 30 Ocean Science Circle, Savannah, Ga., 31411

Directions: http://marex.uga.edu/visit_aquarium/

UGA Skidaway Institute scientist stands atop the globe

 

UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography researcher Chris Marsay has stood on top of the world—literally.

Marsay arrived at the North Pole in early September and took part in the U.S .GEOTRACES Arctic Expedition on board the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a polar icebreaker.

Marsay at the North Pole in front of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy.

Marsay at the North Pole in front of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy.

The project is part of an international, multiple icebreaker effort to conduct geochemical sampling of the Arctic Ocean. The cruise arrived at 90 degrees north on Sept. 5 in what is the first occupation of the North Pole by an unaccompanied U.S. surface ship—submarines usually follow ships below the ice. While at the pole, the Healy rendezvoused with the German ship conducting the German leg of the GEOTRACES Arctic program.

Marsay with his gear at the North Pole.

Marsay with his gear at the North Pole.

Marsay is working with UGA Skidaway Institute professor Cliff Buck and scientists from Florida State University and Rutgers University. The research team was funded by the National Science Foundation to collect samples from the atmosphere, precipitation and surface water from melt ponds during the cruise.

“Our research goals are to describe the chemistry of atmospheric deposition to the region and quantify flux rates,” Buck said. “These data will then be shared with the scientific community to better understand biogeochemical cycling of trace elements and isotopes in the Arctic Ocean.”

R/V Savannah getting an overhaul

The Research Vessel Savannah is currently out of the water and up on blocks at Savannah Marine Repair for biannual maintenance and repair.

RV Savannah Haulout 1 w

RV Savannah Haulout 2 w During this shipyard period, the vessel exterior will be prepped and completely repainted. Propellers, propeller shafts and shaft bearings will be replaced. All fuel tanks will be opened and cleaned and all sea valves will opened, inspected and repaired or replaced as necessary.

A five-year inspection by the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) is being conducted to ensure standards of hull integrity and sea-worthiness. The vessel crew is also undertaking various maintenance tasks prior to the full start of another busy year.